Marcos critics often cite Primitivo Mijares’ book, The Conjugal Dictatorship, and take this book as ABSOLUTE TRUTH about martial law. Many of those who cite this book didn’t even read it, nor did they bother to research Mijares’ reputation as a KNOWN paid propagandist before and during martial law.

ACCORDING TO WIKILEAKS:

“Mission able confirm Primitivo Mijares, former Chairman, Media Advisory Council (abolished November 1974) and well-known Philippine columnist and Marcos apologist has, in fact, abandoned the New Society.

“Mijares’ moved not surprising to Manila community which recognizes him as a complete opportunist who recently was feeling the hot breath of martial law regime for certain recent extra-curricular activities. Allegedly, Mijares gambled away 50,000 dollars of GOP funds during a 1974 Las Vegas visit, misappropriated for personal use 7,000 dollars of the First Lady’s (Imelda) personal funds, and attempted to rape a well-connected Philippine Foreign Service secretary while in New York for the Trade Center opening, all of which accumulated to make the prospect of a return to Philippines decreasingly attractive.”

Wikileaks also revealed that Mijares received “financial inducements” from Marcos’ political enemies, the Lopezes. [1]

Quoting RUBEN DIARIO, in this 1974 article, Managing the media Filipino style:

“The worst of these newspapermen were those who covered the House of Representatives, whose over-100 headline-hungry members were easy pickings for newsmen extortionists. The dean of these Congressional reporters was Mr. Mijares himself (who bragged before martial law that he was worth P3 million), who, upon his appointment as MAC chairman, promptly surrounded himself with his cronies from the Congressional Press Club.

“Mr. Mijares himself is a most interesting case study in media opportunism.” [2]

STEVE PSINAKIS, an anti-Marcos critic married into the Lopez family that owns ABS-CBN, wrote in his memoir:

“The US justice department’s investigation revealed that after his February 1975 defection, Mijares did, in fact, extort money from Marcos by feeding him imaginary information for which Marcos was ignorant enough to pay considerable sums. While Mijares was still receiving money from Marcos, he was at the same time lambasting Marcos in the US press, causing the Marcos regime irreparable damage.” [3]

According to STERLING SEAGRAVE, in his book, The Marcos Dynasty:

“Ferdinand first tried to discredit Mijares by circulating that he had absconded with government funds, that he was paid $150,000 by the Lopezes to join the anti-Marcos exiles, and that he was staying in the United States because of a liaison with a Filipina exile. (Mijares had left his wife and family in Manila.)

“Meanwhile, Mijares was playing both sides against the middle. After “defecting,” he was secretly accepting money from Ferdinand’s agents in exchange for information about the exiles. The FBI discovered later that Mijares had signed several vouchers for $20,000 and at least one of these signatures was authentic. The February 24, 1975 voucher bore the handwritten notation: “Sir; I received this. Tibo Mijares.”

Wouldn’t you question the credibility of this book knowing this was written by someone who was not scrupulous about who paid him for what, and who received money from the number one oligarch during Marcos’ regime: the Lopezes?

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